The Decade Explained

Baby New YearIt’s simple: I attest that there is a new decade knocking at our collective door. It begins on January 1, 2010.

Here’s the math.

The millenium ended on 12/31/1999. Prince has substantiated this in the legendary song “1999.”

Thus, the first day of the new century was 1/1/00. New century AND a new decade. You’re really telling me that centuries and decades begin in different years?

From 1/1/00 to 12/31/00, we lived 365.25 days. By all measurements, that equals one year.

Thus (and I’m going to show my work for once):

1/1/00 to 12/31/00 = 1
1/1/01 to 12/31/01 = 2
1/1/02 to 12/31/02 = 3
1/1/03 to 12/31/03 = 4
1/1/04 to 12/31/04 = 5
1/1/05 to 12/31/05 = 6
1/1/06 to 12/31/06 = 7
1/1/07 to 12/31/07 = 8
1/1/08 to 12/31/08 = 9
1/1/09 to 12/31/09 = 10

Ten years, bitches.

Therefore, I am done with this decade and moving on to a new one. Check out Closing My Decade: a Redhead in Review. And if you haven’t done so, start off your New Year on the right foot by becoming a fan of Redhead Writing on Facebook. We have Taco Thursdays, No Pants Tuesdays and Freeball/Freeboob Fridays.

10 comments
tommytuesday
tommytuesday

You are exactly right, Kiddo!! All people have to do is look back at last century and every decade started with a year ending in 0 and ended in a year ending in 9. The purist say that since we did NOT have a year "zero" to start the AD phase of the calendar and started with year "1", that centuries and decades have to end in zeros. I say, BS! It just means that the first decade only had 9 years (a 'nonade'?) and the first century only 99. And anyway, who says we didn't have a year "zero"? Anybody alive now who was around back then??!

The Redhead
The Redhead

Happy new year to you and yours, Kevin :) Delighted to have you in my world!

The Redhead
The Redhead

You're quite right, Greg. Shame on me for forgetting those extra 3 days and happy new year!

Irant
Irant

Well said, and I'm with you - New Decade in T minus 7 hours (or so) . . .Happy New Year, Red!

gregghaugland
gregghaugland

And a Happy New Year to all as well! Technically speaking, you got the decades right, but not the days. Starting in 2000 (Gregorian calendar of course), you neglected leap years, so add an additional 3 days to play around with this decade. I hope you made good use of them!

The Redhead
The Redhead

Darren, I can always count on you for support. You're my blogging bra.

Ari Herzog
Ari Herzog

Your logic is flawed because centuries and decades DO begin on different years.Quoting trusty Wikipedia: Since the common calendar starts from the year 1, its first full decade contained the years from 1 to 10, the second decade from 11 to 20, and so on. The interval from the year 2001 to 2010 could thus be called the 201st decade, using ordinal numbers. However, contrary to practices in referencing centuries, ordinal references to decades are quite uncommon. -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decade

canoelover
canoelover

Well, technically we enter a new decade every day, It just depends on your definition of decade. Mine is "a ten year period."Eww. Never mind.,,

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